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Taken 3-Dec-10
Visitors 82


9 of 78 photos
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Categories & Keywords

Category:Animals
Subcategory:Insects
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:Flying ant, Winged Termite
Photo Info

Dimensions4288 x 2848
Original file size2.37 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken4-Dec-10 03:51
Date modified23-Mar-12 18:59
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D300S
Focal length60 mm
Focal length (35mm)90 mm
Max lens aperturef/2.8
Exposure1/320 at f/9
FlashNot fired
Exposure bias-1/3 EV
Exposure modeAuto
Exposure prog.Normal
ISO speedISO 200
Metering modeSpot
Digital zoom1x
Winged Termite (Flying ant), Zimbabwe

Winged Termite (Flying ant), Zimbabwe

From Wikipedia:

Termites are a group of eusocial insects that, until recently, were classified at the taxonomic rank of order Isoptera (see taxonomy below), but are now accepted as the epifamily Termitoidae, of the cockroach order Blattodea. While termites are commonly known, especially in Australia, as "white ants", they are only distantly related to the ants.
Like ants, and some bees and wasps—which are all placed in the separate order Hymenoptera—termites divide labor among castes, produce overlapping generations and take care of young collectively. Termites mostly feed on dead plant material, generally in the form of wood, leaf litter, soil, or animal dung, and about 10% of the estimated 4,000 species (about 2,600 taxonomically known) are economically significant as pests that can cause serious structural damage to buildings, crops or plantation forests. Termites are major detritivores, particularly in the subtropical and tropical regions, and their recycling of wood and other plant matter is of considerable ecological importance.
As eusocial insects, termites live in colonies that, at maturity, number from several hundred to several million individuals. Colonies use decentralised, self-organised systems of activity guided by swarm intelligence which exploit food sources and environments unavailable to any single insect acting alone. A typical colony contains nymphs (semimature young), workers, soldiers, and reproductive individuals of both sexes, sometimes containing several egg-laying queens.