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Taken 12-Dec-13
Visitors 25


20 of 78 photos
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Categories & Keywords

Category:Animals
Subcategory:Insects
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:Arthropod, Millipede, Nikon, Pill milipede, Turk Mine, Tzongororo, Zimbabwe, chongololo, jeremysmithphotography.co.uk, jeremysmithphotography.com, zongororo
Photo Info

Dimensions3451 x 1381
Original file size2.75 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spaceAdobe RGB (1998)
Date taken12-Dec-13 15:04
Date modified3-Jan-14 16:05
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D4
Focal length200 mm
Focal length (35mm)200 mm
Max lens aperturef/4.3
Exposure1/250 at f/8
FlashNot fired
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeManual
Exposure prog.Manual
ISO speedISO 100
Metering modeSpot
Digital zoom1x
Millipede, Turk Mine, Zimbabwe1

Millipede, Turk Mine, Zimbabwe1

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Millipedes are arthropods that have two pairs of legs per segment (except for the first segment behind the head which does not have any appendages at all, and the next few which only have one pair of legs). Each segment that has two pairs of legs is a result of two single segments fused together as one. Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical bodies, although some are flattened dorso-ventrally, while pill millipedes are shorter and can roll into a ball, like a pillbug.
The name "millipede" is a compound word formed from the Latinroots mille ("thousand") and pes ("foot"). Despite their name, no known millipede has 1,000 legs, although the rare species Illacme plenipes has up to 750.[2] Common species have between 36 and 400 legs. The class contains around 10,000 species in 13 orders and 115 families. The giant African millipede (Archispirostreptus gigas), is the largest species of millipede.
Millipedes are detritivores and slow moving. Most millipedes eat decaying leaves and other dead plant matter, moisturising the food with secretions and then scraping it in with their jaws. However, they can also be minor garden pests, especially in greenhouseswhere they can cause severe damage to emergent seedlings. Signs of millipede damage include the stripping of the outer layers of a young plant stem and irregular damage to leaves and plant apices, the very top of a plant.